blogging, Digital works, infofails

The last chapter of #infofails… [of 2019]

About #infofails post series: I have a lot of beta graphics that never go public, it can be tons of versions of a graphic or just a few concepts as part of my creative process. So, where all those things go? well, ends-up in #infofails –a collection of my fails at work.

This 2019 is almost gone, big media is doing their “year in graphics” collections, meanwhile I’m in the rush hour trying to fit one more graphic in this year. I’m looking back trough this year, and it has been a crazy one; many unexpected things and lots of changes for me. That’s the case of this project I want to share with you, is one of those unexpected results, or un-result to be accurate.

himalayas

Death rates at the Himalayas peaks

The Mount Everest project (screengrab above) started as a great opportunity for a data narrative, the story behind was the bloom in the climbers amount, many times resulting deathly for them; the whole team was doing pieces to get this story online, if you didn’t saw it, here’s the final result of the project: CLICK HERE. Have a look first, then come back to this story for a better context.

 

 

The fail story

My fails begun when I was trying to get an accurate model of the mountain, I first tried doing some elevation curves map, like the one on top of this entry. The main problem here was to get a good resolution, I was taking as base a 90m DEM produced by NASA, the files are great and works most of the times, but not to the level of detail I was looking for.

himalayas.jpg

90m DEM by SRTM/NASA. This was the starting point.

 

This thing works for a general overview of the whole mountain system of the Himalayas. To me, it was look in a good shape. By exaggerating the elevation, the idea was to add a color range or some other texture to visualize the heights, so then point out the mountains other than the Everest were the climbers usually go.

elevation profile.jpg

Version #1 Himalayas peaks

You maybe noticed that usually I do 1-5 versions of the images to try different ideas, in this case, I didn’t went any further because in the middle of the production some other projects came in. Fortunately my teammates got some other ideas, they took the project from this stage forward. I just jumped in again at the end to collaborate with the finishing touches and adjustments, so I can’t take any credit.

But going back to my fails, I did a few more pieces before the no return point in this project, one of them, a preview of the contours growing-up:

elevation.gif

Everest and surroundings, model based in 90m data by SRTM/NASA.

Also I try some more realistic look using a 30M DEM from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. That one was looking better, but I was already out of time:

crop06_0090.jpg

C4D textured model based on 30m DEM data by SRTM/NASA

basic_gshade.pn

Basic shading. C4D model based in 30m DEM by SRTM/NASA

wiref_01

Color ramp by height, Himalayas system. C4D model based in 30m DEM by SRTM/NASA

wiref_04

Mount Everest close-up. C4D model based in 30m DEM by SRTM/NASA

There was also an other idea to show in this graphic. I was thinking that maybe will be nice to show the equipment that modern climbers uses today in comparison with the equipment of explorers from 60 yeas ago when the mountains were the final frontiers of the unknown. Is incredible that teams went there with heavy and basic equipment and yet make it to the mountain (with great help from the Sherpas of course).

50s_sketch.jpg

Climbers equipment detail. Based in documentation of the British expedition of 1950.

Not sure if this graphic of comparisons will be published or not, so I’ll upload just a tiny little part without information or details, but who knows, you maybe see it next year either at Reuters website, or here as another of my fails for your entertainment haha.

It has been a pleasure to have your comments and readings this year, I hope we will read each other soon.

Happy holidays!

________
Did you like #infofails?
Have a look to other #infofails Chapters here:

–Chapter One
–Chapter Two
–Chapter Three 

Stay tuned for the next chapter in 2020! 🥳

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blogging

Google it!

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Sometime ago I was googling and wondering where all that prediction data comes from. I mean, when you type on google any word or a few words instantaneously pop up 3-5 suggestions related to your search.

Many times the suggestions are simply hilarious, and not that many matches on what I trying to find.

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Anyway, all that data must be stored somewhere, so I took a walk in to the Google’s API worlds and… yes there is a prediction API service based on users inputs, categorised by languages of query’s and accumulated through years of searching. That means when you type something on Google browser, the prediction results displayed are based in the language of input, the popularity around your location thought the time and recent searches you probably made. (Probably not in that order and not always only that)

I know, I know… I’m a little freaky when I found some nice data, but there is a long time since I made a graphic for blogging just for fun, so I collect data from some popular languages to create a new visualisation just for fun.

I made the same input in different languajes:

  • Chinese simplified
  • Chinese traditional
  • Spanish
  • English
  • German
  • French
  • Russian
  • Portuguese
  • Indonesian
  • Japanese
  • Korean

All those languages and some others crossed with keywords like the following:

  • Why Chinese…
  • Why Chinese girls…
  • Why Chinese guys…

The idea was to trigger the Prediction API and in some way reflect the users behavior, stereotypes and maybe some fun content as well. Sometimes the combinations didn’t goes very well and don’t have much sense, so onces filtered, I turned the responses into color patterns all together in a single visualization.

Google_fixed.jpg

That work has been stored for a long time, part because the office is very busy but also because I was waiting to release a new project together with a good friend but finally last December we made it. So if you want to know more about this, take a look in to our new project: Wökpö Lab.

The nice part of this is having Wokpo now I can have a lot of fun more, go and check the digital version of this project, there you can input any keyword you want in any language and see by your self results of different cultures, their stereotypes, their fetish, or their curiosities here is the link again Wökpö Interactive Lab.

 

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blogging, Print graphics

The Acorn Woodpecker design

Some time ago while living there in Costa Rica, near my house were these tireless birds pecking lampposts, I always asked myself how could be that these birds will support all that stress on their heads without any problems.
Drill on wood with the peak would be like ourselves we were to take a door and hitting her with the nose to open a hole in it, not to mention the pain it can cause, the head injury is a real factor, but for some reason these bird is not. So I put myself behind the track that make me understand that about the woodpeckers and the reason of because they can do that, and actually there are several studies explained it, there is even information from other peculiarities of this bird that I found wonderful, so, I decided start this infographic with this information.

layout_0

First draft of the woodpecker infographic 

My initial idea was to talk about those particular things in the bird head, starting with the hyoid bone which happens to be one of those secrets of the Woodpeckers, and provide information of the population and its evolution time, but as sought was more particular details that could become new parts.

layout_1

Process of the main illustration.

I usually work with data and abstractions, but in this case the information is also deserved a more visual and descriptive than quantitative contribution. I start the main illustration  at 400% of the size that eventually would use to gain a little more detail in the finish, it was a good idea I thought the beginning…  but ended up making the process very slow production, added to this, while in Costa Rica worked full time for La Nación news, also had my students and projects with the university there, and some other professional responsibilities drowned me the time to complete this work.

fingers

Up in the picture the original assets from photoshop, down in the picture the final presentation in illustrator.

All that changed suddenly when I left three days journey to a new life in Hong Kong, as it would have very long flights to get here, I found a space to work on this and to conclude what had begun months ago.

I love to do this kind of stuff because there are not tied to the daily work, I do it for the passion about infographics, because data and visual stories fascinate me and because I like to share that wonder that I feel to find complex information and hidden and to bring it to others in a  effective visual way  of consumption,  and also feel that awe for the information that was there before.

woodpecker

Final infographic about the Acorn Woodpecker.

This probably is not the best way to deploy this chart because the difficult to read it, but if you want to see in detail, maybe just click this link to my drive and read it in detail.

I hope the information here is as interesting to you as it was for me, and enjoy the piece as I enjoyed building it for you.

Además hay una versión de este gráfico y post en español en este link.

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blogging

25 earthquakes: A typical day in Costa Rica

Data visualization about the 2014 seismic activity in Costa Rica bit.ly/1yw8vCL  use google chrome for translation.   //  Este es un análisis visual de los datos que ha generado la actividad sísmica sobre la cercana a Costa Rica durante el 2014.

Screen Shot 2014-11-20 at 8.30.34 PM

seismic activity hours visualization [detail]

detalleSismosHEXAGON

[detail] visualization about seismic concentration under Costa Rica.

CRONO_detalle

seismic deep visualization [deatil]

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